No Good Can From It All …. When You Get Congress To Intervene In Sports With Regard To Labor Unrest …………..

No Good Can From It All …. When You Get Congress To Intervene In Sports With Regard To Labor Unrest …………..

Am I completely mistaken but isn’t the US Congress meant to intervene in labor disputes that are of national security or when it comes sensitive areas within the US economy ? Then why oh why is that we’re now seeing both sides of the NFL hierarchy under its Commissioner Roger Goodell, as well as the NFLPA (Union) convening with Congress up on Capitol Hill, in order to get them to mediate or at least in part be an arbitrator in their ongoing unrest with regard to the present ‘collective bargaining agreement ? Having Congress intervene in this is akin to witnessing the idiocy of the legislation passed with regard to the ‘stimulus bil’l. Which has so far cost the taxpayers $787 billion at last count. Never mind the fact that both GM and Chrysler had a piece of the ‘proverbial pie’. And the public in general has yet to see anything tangible from this all.

DeMaurice Smith, Executive Director of the NFLPA is itching for a confrontation with his counterpart, Roger Goodell. And with the owners having opted out of the present collective bargaining agreement. It will now create a chasm whereby the 2010-11 season will become one , that is an uncapped season. Now what this does around the NFL, may well give the suggestion that both sides do indeed know exactly what they’re doing. But it is becoming increasingly clear that this has nothing to do with the agreement itself but more to do with who maintains the balance of power within the NFL. It is more to do with who controls the purse strings as to the $ 8.7 billion a year industry that the NFL is said to to represent globally in terms of the NFL’s business interests. A tidy sum to say the very least and with the greed of both sides said to be unabated . I’m guessing that this could very well lead to one of those confrontations up there on Capitol Hill that will have more to do with posturing by not only the NFL hierarchy and the unions. But also from the legislators who are empaneled on the House Judiciary Committee and who are hearing from both sides on the issue. With the meetings likely to be carried by C-Span , it should make for some very interesting viewing.

NFL  Commissioner   Roger  Goodell.  The  commissioner  this  week   went  to  Capitol Hill  to  address  members  of  the  House  Judiciary  Committee  who  were  empaneled  to  look  into  the  increasing  unrest  between  the  NFL  and   the  NFLPA  (union).  The  two  sides   are   looking  to  stave  off   an  envisaged  lockout.  Moreover ,  the  2010-11  season  will  be  an   uncapped  one  because  the  NFL  and   their  owners  opted  out   of  the  'collective  bargaining  agreement'   that  was  in  place.      photo appears  courtesy  of   ap/ Marc  Gilbert  ...................
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. The commissioner this week went to Capitol Hill to address members of the House Judiciary Committee who were empaneled to look into the increasing unrest between the NFL and the NFLPA (union). The two sides are looking to stave off an envisaged lockout. Moreover , the 2010-11 season will be an uncapped one because the NFL and their owners opted out of the 'collective bargaining agreement' that was in place. photo appears courtesy of ap/ Marc Gilbert ...................

Courtesy of The New York Times

Mara cites lack of progress in talks

By Judy Battista , The New York Times

The Giants co-owner John Mara said Tuesday he was resigned to an uncapped season in 2010 and thought the union and owners might be moving further apart in talks toward a new labor agreement.

Mara was one of the owners who took part in the 11th negotiating session with union leaders in Washington on Tuesday. He is the first owner to speak extensively since negotiations began.

An uncapped year would have no salary limits or floors for teams and would begin in March. It would also start the clock ticking toward a lockout starting in March 2011.

Mara said he still had hope that a lockout could be averted.

“I don’t think we’re making any progress,” Mara said in a telephone interview. “We made a proposal in early November. I don’t think we’ve received a meaningful counterproposal. The point that we try to make to them is that the costs and risks are much greater than they ever have been. Especially in this economy. I don’t think there has been enough of a recognition on their part of that concept.”

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To read Judy Battista’s article in its entirety just click on
the link provided
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NFL Players Association Executive Director, DeMaurice Smith, right and Baltimore Ravens Domonique Foxworth, left, walk into a meeting  with House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers, Jr., D-Mich., on Capitol Hill, Washington D.C. photo  appears  courtesy  of ap/ Alex Brandon   ........
NFL Players Association Executive Director, DeMaurice Smith, right and Baltimore Ravens Domonique Foxworth, left, walk into a meeting with House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers, Jr., D-Mich., on Capitol Hill, Washington D.C. photo appears courtesy of ap/ Alex Brandon ........

There’s no doubt in my mind that the NFL as well as the union are looking to usurp each others’ powers as much as they can. It’s not as if either side has the fan’s best interests at heart to begin with. Goodell for his part wants to prove to the fans and public in general that he’s a strong and very determined commissioner. His sometime autocratic rule has chafed the rationale of Smith and it has to be said that DeMaurice Smith does have some reason to feel aggrieved with many of Goodell’s findings and edicts , as of late. How this all will play out also, may well have to do with who wields the ‘biggest stick’ at the end of the day. Both sides no doubt have their lobbyists up there on Capitol Hill, who are hard at work trying to lay out the case for their client. As to why ‘both’ the NFL and NFLPA should see fit to have lobbyists working on their behalf in Washington , merely suggests that this has more to do with being seen to have the power to get legislation passed that is of benefit to each of the respective parties in question. And for the NFL this amounts to their anti-trust exemption status.

Is it me but are the members of the House Judiciary Committee such a dull and boring group of individuals ? Perhaps none more so than the committee chairman himself, Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich) .This guy makes Pat Robertson seem like a lively, well versed intellectual and then some !. But then again, that’s not saying much about Robertson , given his ‘vile remarks’ aimed towards the Haitian people in the aftermath of the recent earthquake there. Hopefully there’s a f_cking hot place in hell waiting for his racially bigoted a_s !

All of the posturing in the world won’t help change anything if neither side is willing to acquiesce to the others’ wishes . As to what Congress, in this case can do to ramp down the rhetoric between the two sides and force an agreement that is equitable for both parties remains to be seen. I’d certainly like to think that there are far more important domestic issues that need to be addressed , rather than seeing the House Judiciary Committee meet with two sides who are more self absorbed about their own PR images than they are about getting things done. And at the same I’d certainly like to think that DeMaurice Smith can be proactive in addressing the issue as to the conduct of his members. Especially in the case of their off the field behavior. For the NFL and in particular the owners , theirs now is a thankless task as they seemingly don’t viewed as being greedy . But yet with this lone move in the rescinding of an agreement that they’ve failed to honor. How must it look to the fans and general public to begin with ? Surely the owners and the Goodell’s office had to have foreseen that there would be an economic downturn of sorts ? Never mind how acute it has now become. It’s all about planning and getting your ducks all lined up in a row. Instead they’ve feasted on the largess of the fans and the public over the years while growing extremely wealthy from all of their business dealings and maneuvers. The average value of an NFL franchise has increased exponentially over the last decade. In fact it has increased in excess of 25 % over that period. Pardon me for saying this but if they’re now claiming poverty then there’s something indeed wrong with the business template under which the NFL now works .

In November of last year, I wrote an article entitled ‘Trust Me I’m A Doctor …………It’s Money For Nothing And The Chicks Are Free’ ! The piece in question, went on to suggest how I felt that many of the US owners who had made the foray into owning an English soccer club within the Premiership (EPL), were in fact no better than that of disgraced financiers Bernie Madoff and Allen Stanford. In each case it has led to the demise of their respective financial empires and the loss of untold billions of dollars for their prospective clients. Madoff was sentenced to 150 years in prison, while Stanford awaits trial through the US Federal Court System.

Malcolm Glazer far right seen here with sons Joel (left) and Bryan. The family's sporting business interests includes the ownership of the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the English Premiership League's Manchester United. picture appears courtesy of ap/photo/ Mike Nugent .......
Malcolm Glazer far right seen here with sons Joel (left) and Bryan. The family's sporting business interests includes the ownership of the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the English Premiership League's Manchester United. picture appears courtesy of ap/photo/ Mike Nugent .......

It has been well chronicled that the Glazer family having bought Premiership side Manchester United had hoped to carry on the same undoubted success the team has come to be known for over the past quarter of a century. Their unparalleled success with manager, Sir Alex Ferguson at the helm has made the team ‘the most glamorous and most valuable sports franchise in the world’ .

Initially the purchase was met with a great deal of skepticism and the fact that the family used very little money of their own in the purchase, should’ve been enough of an indication that they were being capricious and overwhelmingly disingenuous as to their overall intentions concerning the team. They leveraged the team buy borrowing against its assets in order to facilitate the purchase . The price at the time was in excess of $1.255 billion including fees. Four years on into the ownership by the family , ticket prices have risen in excess of 45% and the team is laden with a debt in excess of $1.11 billion . As to what that would suggest as to the business acumen of the family , is that they’re nowhere competent enough to be running a sports franchise. With Malcolm Glazer, as the patriarch now handing over the reins of running the club to his sons, Byran , Joel and Avram Glazer. It was felt their custodianship of the club would be in safe hands. At this juncture that doesn’t appear to be the case at all.

United manager, Sir Alex Ferguson seen here in a CNN interview discussing his famed managerial career. Ferguson is the most successful soccer coach in Premiership history. Prior to his ascending to the position as manager on Manchester United , he also assembled a successful resume’ as coach of Scottish Premier League team Aberdeen FC.

Courtesy of The Guardian UK

Manchester United’s sales pitch is far from a premium bond

The Glazer family’s attempt to raise money to pay off massive debts paints a bleak picture of Manchester United’s future

By David Conn , The Guardian

When navigating the thunderously depressing proposal by the Glazer family to load Manchester United with £500m of debt for the third time since their takeover in May 2005, it helps to imagine where United might be had the Glazers never turned up in the first place, to buy the glory, glory club with all their borrowed millions.

Before engaging with Sir Alex Ferguson’s remarkable contention that United’s finances, laden with borrowings over £700m and £67m interest payable last year, are “of no concern at all”, recall what the United board itself said at the time. When Malcolm Glazer and his six children – who, we now know, have borrowed £10m from United – launched their takeover bid, the board, which included the current chief executive David Gill, expressed vehement opposition to it.

Echoing the concerns of the well-informed United fans’ campaign, the board warned that the Glazers’ business plan was “aggressive”, and that the proposed structure for the club “still contains more leverage [debt] than the board would consider prudent and that as a consequence there is likely to be significant financial strain on the business.”

Despite that, the Glazers bought the club for £810m, a fortune pocketed greedily by enough shareholders in what was then Manchester United plc. The Glazers paid £270m themselves, borrowing the other £540m from banks and hedge funds. In the four years up to the latest accounts to 30 June 2009, United became liable to pay more than £325m in interest alone, yet the interest they have not paid, plus fees, has increased the debt the Glazers loaded on to United to £700m.

United, and Ferguson, now argue it is all fine, the club are not constrained by that debt mountain and the board was therefore wrong in its warning back then. Ferguson said last week that the windfall from the £81m sale of Cristiano Ronaldo is there for him to spend, but he does not want to because the market is overpriced. That assertion has been rather undone by the prospectus, which sets out the plan to transfer £70m cash from United to one of the Glazers’ holding companies, partly to pay off the hedge funds which charge swingeing 14.25% interest.

Now imagine how United might look without the Glazer debt. True, as a plc – the Stock Market listing which football executives now agree was a failed experiment, despite defending it zealously at the time – United paid dividends to shareholders. Yet even allowing for the increase in turnover, from £171m to the most recent £278m, the 2004 dividend was £7m, nothing like the mountain of interest, £42m to banks, £25m to hedge funds, with which the Glazers have burdened United.

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In order to read David Conn’s article in its entirety
just click on the link provided
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With the team now ‘hemorrhaging red ink’ all over its balance sheet , it has to be said that the Glazers have been completely inept in their running of the team. On the field they still continue to have success but there mere thought that they’re now being brought to brink of bankruptcy is enough to send shivers down the spine of entire Premiership (EPL). Never mind the fact that the family’s other sporting interest, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers is now undergoing a change in its persona as well as in terms of its executive and coaching structure. First time GM, Mark Dominik and coach Raheem Morris have been thrust into the deep end . With the firing of their predecessors Bruce Allen and Jon Gruden. The team underwent a less than stellar season in the NFL, posting a 3-13 record in the NFC South. And with the front office being reluctant to spend money in attracting talent to the team . It is understandable why the franchise is now in such a dire predicament. They aren’t in the slightest bit interested in being a serious contender within the NFL and both Morris and Dominik are merely paying lip service with their inane comments to begin with. They’re fully aware as to the financial dilemma and maelstrom that the organization is now in. The Glazers will do whatever they can to ‘pay the piper’ in order to try and stave off financial bankruptcy. They have been far too secretive as to their financial dealings and their present situation.

Raheem  Morris (second from the right)  is  seen here  alongside    Edward  and  Brian Glazer (center)  with   Joel  Glazer   far   right.    Left   is  Buccaneers'  GM,  Mark  Dominik .    photo  appears  courtesy  of   Getty  Images /  Paul  Mason  .....................
Raheem Morris (second from the right) is seen here alongside Edward and Brian Glazer (center) with Joel Glazer far right. Left is Buccaneers' GM, Mark Dominik . photo appears courtesy of Getty Images / Paul Mason .....................

The latest ploy by the Glazers initiated by Malcolm’s sons, is have a bond issue, in order to pay off some of the mounting debt and accruing interest that’s owed to their creditors. But herein lies the rub, the family is asking that United players participate in the exercise in order to show good faith, to try to elicit fans, as well as members of the public and public institutions into entering the endeavor. If they can’t be trusted to keep the club in a healthy financial state then why should it be incumbent on the players to participate in this maneuver ? If anything Bryan, Joel and Avram are looking to save their own asses as they to try not to embarrass the family any further with the sheer ineptitude shown by them when it comes to their financial dealings and business acumen, as it not only relates to the soccer club but also to their NFL franchise.

It is hoped that the NFL hierarchy as well its board of governors are keeping a watchful eye on the Glazer family and their dealing with both sport’s franchises within their custodianship . If one should fail then there’s no reason to believe why the other can’t be placed in a similar predicament.

In order to read ‘Trust Me I’m A Doctor ……It’s Money For Nothing And The Chicks Are Free’ ….click here.

The  always  delectable   Vida   Guerra  .  More  than  willing  to  aspire to  meeting  a  man's   many   needs  and  then  some  !
The always delectable Vida Guerra . More than willing to aspire to meeting a man's many needs and then some !

Author: tophatal ...........

An avid sports' fans that's all !!!!!

34 thoughts on “No Good Can From It All …. When You Get Congress To Intervene In Sports With Regard To Labor Unrest …………..”

  1. Ya know whut? Congress, collectively, cannot keep anything “under control”. The constant bickering and posturing “he/she said” and so on has left me and many, many others, I am sure, ticked off and bewildered.
    It was bad enough to bail the banks who created the entire mess, but to then basically take control of the auto industry and dictate who would be CEO’s and other leaders, but now they might be asked to look into another “private industry” which just happens to be doing QUITE well…well it is just inane.
    As I said above, Congress is not controlling anything….the banking industry is doing as it pleases, as is the drug companies, health insurance companies and on and on. True, these are PRIVATE businesses, but by causing ever spiraling costs, our Country will again get screwed.
    In all this the fans suffer, as the public at large suffers from increasing prices on everything. It is time for the public to demand the Congress to do what they were elected for…legislate for the good of the Nation, not delve into private successful businesses. It is time for people to grow some gonads and take back the Nation.
    The last time National Security was threatened, President Truman threatened to take over the railroads and the coal inductries (it didn’t happen, but that tactic worked. This thing with the NFL and the Union should be allowed to run its course…how will the public be hurt? Will the moon fall on the Earth if an agreement is not forthcoming? Will the oceans dry up? Is it a matter of “National Security”?
    True, if there is a strike or a lockout, people will lose money…big time…all the companion industries that contribute will suffer, but it is time for the owners and the players to realize that many of us would be pleased to play football for a lot less money.
    It is also time for the owners, collectively, to say enough is enough….this is what we will pay you to play the game…no more! No more bidding wars for a player, no more raiding another team’s roster through huge salary offers.
    Time to say as Lee Iacooca said years ago…I have plenty of jobs at 28 dollars an hour, but none at 38 dollars an hour. I remember the strike year, time for a lockout and reduction in salaries…there are enough people out there who can compete, maybe not at the present level, but all things being equal good enough to make the games entertaining.
    No salary cap? No salary. Take away Free Agency also…..get paid to play, okay, but at our salary.
    Maybe the NFL should do as the rest of the American businesses have done, outsource it all to China, Taiwain, India and Pakistan!

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    1. NOW Iam waiting some replies to my comment…keep it nice, though. I am so tired of millionaire sports figures while others are on poverty row!

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      1. al clements

        Millionaires or in this case a billionaire family such as the Glazers are mere parasites. They screw up royally by speculating with other peoples’ monies and then expect to be bailed out not only by their employees but also the fans and general public.

        I just hope that the board of governors of the NFL are keeping a close watch on this all ! The same mess has now another British Premier league soccer club (Liverpool FC) is embroiled in a financial mess with its owners, George Gillette and Tom Hicks and the fans.

        Liverpool fans are making their thoughts known and their voices heard on the matter.

        Hicks also owns the NHL’s Dallas Stars and MLB’s Texas Rangers . The franchises stateside are all in something of a financial mess and it’s all of Hicks’ own doing and irrational thinking and business conduct.

        This as_hole has no business acumen whatsoever ! He think he’s Texas’ answer to J R Ewing of the tv show ‘Dallas’ fame.
        He’s now mired the team with so much debt that they can’t even afford to buy new talent. Instead they’re under a constant threat to sell off their best players just to stay afloat.

        The two between them couldn’t be trusted to run a kid’s lemonade stand but yet they’re running wild within the world of sport’s franchise ownership. This has nothing to do with a dire economy but more to do with ‘greed and malfeasance’ on their part, while screwing everyone else around them .

        Never mind the fact that should either of these franchises end up in bankruptcy they could walk away wiping their hands of the mess that they initially created. And it’s also the same thing with the Glazer family. They’re treated like deities here within the Tampa area. Because the fans are far too dumb to realize that they’re being taken for a ride.

        Alan Parkins

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    2. al clements

      Both houses screwed up mightily, the moment they repealed so many parts of the Glass Steagall Act that allowed banks to freely roam and enter into areas that they had no business being part of. Now you’ve got insurance companies that are in part banks. And even the mighty Wal-Mart is now getting in on the act.

      And idiots such as Chris Dodd on the Senate Banking Committee and Barney Frank on the House Finance Committee couldn’t tell you a derivative from an expletive. That’s how dumb so many members of the Congress actually are !

      Geithner and Dodd have been very disingenuous. Look at this video in whole and you can see what an ass this guy really is !

      Now you’ve got the Treasury Dept and Tim Geithner looking to revamp the laws that covers financial regulations within the industry. And no doubt once again it’ll be left to the finance industry lobbyists to rewrite the new rules altogether. Despite all of the altruism of Congress and the Obama administration . These guys haven’t a pot to pi_s in and a window to throw it out of . They absolutely cannot be trusted implicitly to do what’s right and is in the nation’s best interests.

      I’m now getting letters from my credit card company advising me of their new ‘fees’ and soon to be interest rate hikes ? WTF ? I paid off the balance and sent them a cursory note telling them that I’ll no longer be availing them off their services. ‘Cash Rules Everything Around Me’ (CREAM)…….dollar, dollar bills yah !

      Alan Parkins

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    3. al clements

      That’s unlikely to happen . However the NFL will seek out new boundaries in order that its brand product can reach new markets globally. They may well look to expand by actually having an NFL franchise south of the border. However I doubt that they’ll want to venture north and upset the apple cart with regard to the Canadian Football League (CFL) .

      And in spite of them having a presence in the UK with an office in London. I for one can’t envisage there being a franchise in London or any other part of Europe for that matter. There’s interest there as a fan but only for the curiosity value of it all. Going up against soccer they’re in ‘no man’s land as far as that’s concerned. And the novelty of having a preseason or regular season played outside North America is just that. Simply a novelty and that’s it !

      The NFL and its properties have international operations on a number of continents. And now it’s looking to have its tentacles reach farther afield. There are billion people in China and then throw in another 800 million plus on the sub Indian continent . And that’s one hell of a market to delve into. And obviously there’s a great deal of money to be made when it’s all said and done. The ‘NFL hierarchy ‘ ,NFLPA , as well as the owners wouldn’t want it any other way.
      As they all get to share in the bounty.

      Alan Parkins

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  2. al clements

    I think that Michael Douglas’ words as Gordon Gekko in the movie ‘Wall St’ (1987) pretty much sums up today’s present sport’s franchise owners , as well their respective governing bodies. And it’s very much true of our federal legislators also.

    Is it any wonder that Oliver Stone is making a sequel to the original . As it’s still pretty much pertinent today in terms of the subject matter.

    The trailer for the Fox movie from ’87 .

    Memorable quotes from the movie .

    Marv ‘Very nice. So what is it, *Mr.* Cocksucker now?’

    Bud Fox ‘I’m tapped out Marv. American Express’ got a hit man lookin’ for me.’

    Gordon Gekko ‘When I get a hold of the son of a bitch who leaked this, I’m gonna tear his eyeballs out and I’m gonna suck his fu_king skull’.

    Bud Fox ‘How much is enough’ ?

    Gordon Gekko ‘Mixed emotions , buddy. Larry Wildman is going off a cliff in my new Maserati’ .

    Gordon Gekko’ The richest one percent of this country owns half our country’s wealth, five trillion dollars. One third of that comes from hard work, two thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons and what I do, stock and real estate speculation. It’s bullshit. You got ninety percent of the American public out there with little or no net worth. I create nothing. I own. We make the rules, pal. The news, war, peace, famine, upheaval, the price per paper clip. We pick that rabbit out of the hat while everybody sits out there wondering how the hell we did it. Now you’re not naive enough to think we’re living in a democracy, are you buddy? It’s the free market. And you’re a part of it. You’ve got that killer instinct. Stick around pal, I’ve still got a lot to teach you’.

    That last statement might just be the seminal moment in the whole movie as it perfectly sums up the generation of that era. And not that much has changed since.

    Click here to read some of the other memorable quotes from the movie itself.

    Alan Parkins

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  3. al clements

    Note Goodell and the NFL’s legal counsel faces a hearing in the US Supreme Court to challenge their anti-trust exemption status, stemming from the NFL's wish to only deal with certain manufacturers and their licensed apparel. If the judgment hearing goes against them then it could well have some serious ramifications and repercussions as to how the NFL conducts its business in the future.

    The case here in question is ‘American Needle vs. NFL’

    Courtesy of the Wall St Journal

    An anti-trust Superbowl …

    Will the Supreme Court let the NFL behave like a normal business ?

    The pro football playoffs got underway this weekend, but fans might want to know that the line of scrimmage is moving today to the domed stadium known as the U.S. Supreme Court. The Justices will hear oral arguments on whether a sports league may function as a single business, and make its licensing decisions accordingly.

    American Needle v. NFL concerns the league’s 2001 agreement to give Reebok exclusive rights to make hats, T-shirts or other gear emblazoned with a team logo. According to American Needle, the exclusive agreement violates Section 1 of the Sherman Act by restricting competition. The plaintiffs say the league-wide deal is unfair coordination among the 32 NFL teams it claims should be acting as competitors on and off the field.

    That argument hasn’t gotten much traction so far: The NFL won in federal district court and again when the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the 32 teams operate as a single business to compete with baseball, hockey, and other entertainment products. The individual franchises thus aren’t independent businesses so much as partners. One competitive secret of the NFL has long been its revenue sharing among teams, which (unlike baseball) helps competitive balance and makes it possible for small-market teams to win Super Bowls.

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    Click on link to read article in
    its entirety
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    Alan Parkins

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    1. Chris Humpherys

      After I came out of the military I had the chance to work within the ‘Square Mile’ , the financial heartbeat of the city of London. There’s more money and financial derivatives traded there ‘daily’ than on the entire NYSE and the CBOT combined. I worked there for over a decade.

      I’ve worked within various fields from mergers & acquisitions to investment banking and also as an arbitrage money market dealer and analyst.I ended being a research analyst making recommendations that essentially covering the market growth of companies of various sizes. The information that I picked up and learned could literally be uses to write War & Peace several times over.

      And now I’m supposed to think that Tom Hicks and the Malcolm Glazer’s sons know what the fu_k they’re doing ? Hell no ! They’re a bunch of friggin’ shysters, charlatans and shylocks ! They’re now become like a pack of parasites whose intent it is to make someone else pay for their financial mistakes.

      They’ll end up sending one the two franchises to the brink of financial bankruptcy that’s for sure. It’s now a ‘pick em’ as to which one it’ll be. Bucs or Manchester Manchester ? Place your bet ?

      Alan Parkins

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  4. Not one person has learned anything from history. High wages only begets higher costs that is ALWAYS passed on to the consumers….who happen to be those making the products to begin with….except in Sports, where they earn so much money…….Course the IRS likes this, isn’t their take something like 40%? Course high paid athletes probably have myriad tax shelters, just as big business and wealthy billionaires/millionaires do. Time for the world to stop and let me off

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    1. al clements

      The members of both legislative houses have their heads buried so far up each others’ sphincters that they couldn’t care less about what’s now happening to the ordinary ‘man on the street’. Have you ever heard the likes of Rep’s John Murtha (D-Pa) , former congressman
      Tom Tancredo
      , Nancy Pelosi (D-Ca) , Charles Rangel (D-Ny) and John Conyers (D-Mi) have spoken condescendingly towards constituents as if they’re indeed fecal matter on the soles of their shoes.

      All of the above morons are so disingenuous that it’s beyond belief. Never mind the fact that they’re sent back in office repeatedly by a ‘completely clueless electorate’ to begin with

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    1. Chris Humpherys

      In this economic crisis there’s no one stupid enough who’ll want to buy a professional sports franchise at this juncture. And that includes the Bucs . There’s declining attendance for all of the major sports. And with the owners continually looking for ever more discerning revenue streams. The one thing that most have been doing is to in some way rise prices for certain types of tickets as well as things such as concessions and parking.

      The broadcast and cable outlets are no longer scared of the likes of MLB, NBA, NFL ,NHL or NASCAR for that matter. And even though they’ve gone out and started up their own fledgling programming outlets. The expertize and start up costs for them have been enormous.

      Does anyone now think that it’s the likes of Goodell, Selig , Stern , Bettman or Brian France who holds all of the cards when it comes to negotiating the broadcast rights and fees for the sports programming ? Hell no , as it’s now tv and cable outlets who hold ‘the real power’. And they can essentially tell each of those bodies what they’re prepared to pay and over what length of time.

      Why else would the NFL choose to rescind the CBA (collective bargaining agreement) ? Declining revenues streams and the mere fact that they knew that they couldn’t hold the likes of CBS, NBC Fox Sports or ABC/ESPN hostage any longer.

      *
      The most valuable sports franchises according to Forbes.com

      Alan Parkins

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  5. Chris Humpherys

    Who do you feel now is most reviled sports owner that the city of Tampa has had ? Vince Naimoli ? Hugh Culverhouse ? Oren Koules ? The Glazer family ?

    You let me know when you’ve thought enough about it ?

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  6. Know Murtha….big windbag lately….Don’t like him. Course he brings in a lot of Federal money to Western Penna; hell it is our (taxpayers) money to begin with…….And besides that all the other politicians feel the same….they feel they are doing people a great service by giving back a smidgen of OUR tax money….while they are paid handsomely for their “work”, most of which is done by the lobbyists and staff….

    Like

    1. al clements

      Well there’s nothing like a lobbyist that’ll make either a congressman or congresswoman happy. I don’t know if there’s meant to be some sort of sexual connotation that can be taken from that. But I do feel that they’re both deserving of each other.

      And for those who are now of the opinion that the Federal Judiciary knows what the fu-k they’re doing . Then think again , as with this latest decision they have in effect left the ‘McCain-Feingold Bill’ as little more than light reading. Now it not only gives corporations the right to dictate and fix the outcome of an election but it also makes a mockery of the democratic system altogether.

      Corporations and union shouldn’t be allowed to be integrally a part of the process at such a level. But here the elections are no longer about policies. It’s more about who looks good without stating much of anything.

      Alan Parkins

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    2. al clements

      To paraphrase an old saying …..

      ‘You can lead a politician to water and they already know how to drink. But when it comes to taking a shit however. They do that with a great deal of regularity over their own constituents and then some ‘ !
      ‘nough said I don’t that I can put it anymore succinctly than that.

      Alan Parkins

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  7. See?? Wasn’t this why “we” fought two wars with the Brits?? Damn…we are being taxed but really have no representation….if we had, we would have not been in ‘Nam, Iraq (2nd time) or Afganistan. It is like everything else, who ever is in power gets the “right” to screw over all the rest.

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    1. al clements

      Tax ? You want taxes you’re going to get them one way or another. What is it that most don’t seem to get ? The government in order to operate needs the revenues it derives from taxes. It’s as plain and simple as that ! What they seem to think is that by continually lowering the rate it makes for a better all round economic environment. How will that be possible with even less revenue coming in and when each successive administration choosing to spend more on their own ‘pet projects’ ? They’re of the opinion that things will change for the better. That’s such an asinine notion to begin with. It certainly didn’t work under Reagan or any other administration thereafter.

      Trickle down economics ‘was just that’ , it went into the pockets of the ‘chosen few’ and absolutely no one else !

      And oh by the way , the only people being taxed in the country without full representation are the constituents and electorate who reside in Washington D.C. That’s your democracy and tax paying dollars at work my friend ! Chew on that and have fun while doing so. Yippee ! Rah, rah rah ! Isn’t it good to be alive and to know that your government doesn’t actually give a rat’s ass about you at all ?

      Alan Parkins

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  8. Ah…”full representation”??? My friend that doesn’t exist….many people have written their congersmen (snakemen) opposing all kinds of things…had no effect. They keep pushing for Obama’s plan…written by lobbyists for not the public…..Where is the reformation? Drug companies and health insurance continues to climb, while Medicare and all keeps getting cut and S/S keeps raising the fees…….
    I’m no cogzinant of much good that has come out of DC without great costs to the taxpayers….many would like less, might give them some more in their pockets to spend.

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    1. al clements

      Then in effect the Constitution as it was written doesn’t stand the litmus test.

      As to Obama’s so called agenda what is it meant to be ? At least he is being was more open than the sh_t that Cheney was ‘trying to pull’ with the energy companies and then claiming it was being done in the interest of national security . All of these guys are a bunch of _ucking hypocrites. But in the end the vast majority will take sides and simply don’t read between the damn lines.

      You’d stated that McCain’s economic policy was much more sound than Obama’s ? In what way was it and give a principle wherein it was ? ’cause when I last looked all McCain kept on about was the same asinine doctrine that Bush had in place that set the country on the path it was on. And that was to sit aside and not to do a damn thing.

      Alan Parkins

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  9. I don’t think I ever said McCain’s policy better than Obama’s. I just thought that McCain, old as he is, would have not proposed the type of health bill that is being espoused by the DEms. True enough we need Reformation, but there are so many add ons to the current bill and deals made to get some to vote for it….Nebraska and Louisiana comes to mind.
    Obama may or may not be open,,,,haven’t seen any politician in my 67 years, minus 50 years be completely forthcoming….even FDR held secrets, look he dided without Harry S even knowing the USA had the A bomb.
    I hold fast to the notion that the “guvmint” by and for the people does not exist any longer…..we are back to what occured after that “big war” that set us free….the “rich” (for that time) and powerful….elitists if you will ran the country…..Do you know that the Slaves would have been free had it not been for the “elitists” of the South who claimed, truthfully, that they would pull out if….cause their economy would be ruined without slavelabor….I dunno, I think the “common man” has never been able to be heard, but they sure are able to bleed and die for the USA.

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    1. al clements

      You stated that you felt his(McCain’s) economic policies were better in terms of their basis . Be that as it may McCain was never a monetarist much less an economic genius. Neither was Palin , who for all of her touting as to the economic successes she claims she brought about in Alaska. They’ve brought about nothing. She merely used the royalties the state receives from the oil producers in the state to cover up the massive budgetary deficits that she and the state legislature built up over the period of her tenure as governor. Then she reneges on her principles to seek fame and fortune by stating that she can no longer serve the electorate there.

      And the electorate on national basis is now suppose to see her as a ‘viable candidate’ in 2012 ?

      Alan Parkins

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      1. Ah well….tis sad but true: No matter who is “in control” our once great Nation is on a very slippery slope….reminds me of a book: “The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire”……y’know I really believe we are going that way, only we are being defeated from within.

        Like

  10. al clements

    The mistake the Democrats made was that in thinking with the 60 votes held in the Senate. They’d be able to get the legislation enacted. What they hadn’t foreseen was that Martha Coakley would be a pi_s poor candidate in Massachusetts. And at the same time there was no clear cut explanation as to what they wanted to make part of their health care reform altogether.

    Each and every step they expected Obama to be the mouth piece for it all. And unfortunately the administration and the leadership in both houses are showing how entirely incompetent they all are !

    I bet you weren’t even aware as to that tidbit of information I gave out concerning Tim Geithner as a Deputy Assistant Chairman with the Federal Reserve in New York ? Much of the dealings that went on in New York was siphoned through the Fed there , in NYC. Literally trillions of dollars were being traded in derivatives under their very noses . And much of this, he was completely aware of. But he showed absolutely no due diligence when banks weren’t meeting the strict criteria as to the asset to ratio liabilities and borrowings.

    Alan Parkins

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    1. I read that about Tim “G”. Just another example of how inept the “Fed” is, especially since Greenberg left, but even before. No qualtative oversight…relying heavily on self-enforcement akin to the fox and weasel patrolling the henhouse. Again, no one, NO ONE in or out of government evidently has ever read history….all the crashes, depressions, recessions etc. can be traced back to profit taking with no “cash” to back it up. Who was it..JP Morgan who stopped a crash prior to ’29 by buying up stocks etc., in essence bailing everyone out….course I wonder if it was all bought on the 10% basis….I have read that the reason for the ’29 crash was that only 10% would get you all the stocks and bonds you wanted, then something happened to cause the panic and selling was rampant….no money to back up the stocks and bonds…sounds like the “mortgage crisis”?
      I had a Great Aunt and Uncle (mother’s side) who went on a “1 year” around the world cruise…they had stored all their belongings, etc. When they returned the crash had happened…lost everything, couldn’t even get stuff out of storage to sell…..he went out and blew his brains out…anoither laid down on the r/r tracks…..paper wealthy, right.

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      1. al clements

        The oversight is there I can assure of you of that. But there’s a tendency that those upon high when they’re told of something being awry. They more often than not tend not lot to listen ’til the shit’ has hit the proverbial fan .

        It was the same thing with the Madoff scandal after the SEC and its former Chairman Christopher Cox had been sent numerous requests to investigate the claims being made by Madoff’s company.

        The SEC for their part claimed that they were deluged with other investigations and that they were either short-staffed or didn’t have suitably well qualified or trained auditors and investigators to conduct the investigations and audits needed. Typical bureaucratic bulls_hit as always. And no one within the SEC has been held accountable or even reprimanded for their failure in conducting a proper investigation of the company.

        What are these Federal agencies meant to be ? Because at face value they seem to not know what the hell they are doing !

        Alan Parkins

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  11. You are right, of course. I was going to mention Madoff…but you already knew this. I read about Ponzi..the guy for whom the scheme is named…guess he was the first one caught, thus the name….had to be plenty before him…..
    Course, being a studious Police Officer I found a great wealth of information. One thing that I had learned though…laws are only for honest people…just as locks are only for those who are not criminals. I have the equiv of a Masters in Police Science…having earned many credits past my BA…..Taught Officers “how to be” officers……That said, it is a shame how corrupt people have become. This is the basis for the various “stings” that are rooting out “criminals”. Course I used stings, but only when warranted…sometimes I felt the stings “baited” people who would not have broke a law, but then………..

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    1. al clements

      From where I sit ‘white collar crime’ is just as heinous as homicide, rape or drug trafficking on a larcenous scale. It’s often viewed as being something of a ‘victimless crime’. But nothing could be further from the truth. One has only to look at the victims of Madoff’s and Allen Stanford’s deceit, to see how much harm that can be caused. In many cases the victims have lost their entire life savings and have been forced to return to work in order to have something to put by for their very dear future.

      And this is why I believe that there should be governmental oversight and regulations covering the financial markets. But most idiots ‘on the right’ believe that markets can regulate themselves. That’s fuc_king load of bull_hit to begin with as they’ve never self regulated. What did they think that caused the market crash of the thirties ? And then in the eighties ?

      Alan Parkins

      Like

  12. al clements

    If there’s one thing that the US now doesn’t want . Well it is for China to now show a lack of faith in the US government and for her start to dump whatever equities and treasury bonds that they now hold. If they were to now to do that then it’d set of a crash that we’d have not seen in years.

    That’s why the US needs China more than anyone is willing to let on.

    China has now in excess of $2.1 trillion ($2,100,000,000,000) of US assets in its keeping. That cover US treasury bonds and other various equities. That figure represents just under 16% of the gross GDP for the United States as a nation.

    Alan Parkins

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  13. Ref China: True…didn’t know it was that mcuh though. How did it happen?? Greed, avarice and absolute corruption by politicians, businesses and even unions. People just don’t “get it”. All those “things” we buy made in China and elsewhere caused our trade deficit to go through the roof and then some.
    Things just got completely out of hand, with everyone feeding at the trough.
    There doesn’t have to be a war…China can bring us to our knees at anytime….so can Russia in some respects…..thing is people are people, governments aren’t. I believe in the hinterlands of most countrie the US still is liked, but………

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    1. One other thing…back around ’72 Nixon (remember him?) had a price/wage freeze across the Nation. It seemed to work, although I don’t remember if the banking industry was frozen or not….Point is, had this been left in place I truly believe the US would have been better off……Go back to that day, Japan was not selling huge number of cars, just about everything we purchased was made in the US….inflation wasn’t rampant. I had money in my pocket AFTER payday and paying my bills, on about 6200 dollars a year…steelworkers were making perhaps 10,000 per year. Ah well

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      1. al clements

        The only thing that the country still has in its favor may well be its military might . Other than that they haven’t a pot to pi_s in or a window to throw it out of. The dollar is no longer the most trade currency in the world. Albeit that it is still arguably the ‘international currency of trade’ but beyond that the US has now become bankrupt of ideas and creativity.

        The wage freeze by Nixon was needed but there’d be no way that the country or the legislature could’ve allowed to stand long term . It would begin to hurt the country over the long term economically, in terms of the spending power of the nation.

        I’d finished a piece on NBC and with them being taken over by Comcast . Upon my doing my research I wasn’t aware that Comcast were also part owners of the NHL’s Philadelphia Flyers as well as the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers ? Apparently the Roberts’ (owners of Comcast) family’s holding company Comcast/Spectacor are both teams’ proprietary owner.

        Once the piece up , I’ll provide you with a direct link to it via e-mail.

        Alan Parkins

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    2. al clements

      China for one thing , won’t fall into the same trap that the Japanese did when they were heavily vested in a wide variety of US equities. The mistake that they made was in plowing their monies into the commercial real estate market just as it was about to ‘tank’. Once the bottom fell out of it all . They began to lose their shirts and whatever else they had at the time. Boy was that all so brutal ? It sent a seismic shot across the equities’ markets across the globe. The DJIA (Dow Jones) dropped like a ‘lead balloon’ to unprecedented lows not seen in years at the time.

      President Obama and China’s President Hu Jintao.

      What China will do is to watch and assess how Obama and his administration deals with the economy and the burgeoning deficits and national debt. Never mind the fact that the US Commerce Dept are making ‘overt’ and ‘antagonistic’ noises to the Chinese and how they control their currency (yuan) by stabilizing it against the US dollar by creating an artificial exchange rate. What they seem to forget, this is no different to the US government placing tariffs and at the same time subsidizing their farmers .

      Alan Parkins

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