PTI (Pardon The Interruption) But You’re Going To Pay Him What ? How Much ? Get The **ck Out Of Here !

PTI (Pardon The Interruption) But You’re Going To Pay Him What ? How Much ? Get The **ck Out Of Here ! ……….

Having led the organization to their second Superbowl appearance in three years. The Indianapolis Colts’ hierarchy and front office are looking to lock up their 4 time league MVP and Superbowl MVP (SBXLI) winning quarterback, Peyton Manning to a contract extension, that could in effect net him in excess of $ 120 million dollars , if he fulfills the obligations of the contract that’s allegedly being drawn and which awaits the player’s signature at the culmination of this year’s Superbowl. Colts’ owner, Jim Irsay, the team’s GM, Bill Polian and team coach Jim Caldwell are all in accordance with this. As to what this would suggest to Manning’s teammates is only a matter of speculation and conjecture. But suffice to say ‘….Peyton is getting his just like any other player , who expects to be amply rewarded for their exploits on the field of play. Manning , himself is said to earn in excess of $ 20 million a year, in terms of commercial endorsements from corporate sponsors , alone. That supplements his NFL salary rather nicely , placing him amongst the 40 highest paid athletes on the planet.

Indianapolis Colts' Peyton Manning answers questions during a media availability,Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Indianapolis will face the New Orleans Saints in the NFL football Super Bowl XLIV Sunday. It's  widely  being  rumored  that the  Colts'  quarterback <strong>  is  about  to sign the most  lucrative  contract in  the  NFL history</strong>. Though  figures  have  yet  to be confirmed .  It is believed  that the  contract  will  eclipse  that  signed  by his younger  brother Eli,  worth  at the time <strong> $97.5 million  over   6  years</strong>.  photo appears  courtesy of Associated  Press / Eric  Gay ......
Indianapolis Colts' Peyton Manning answers questions during a media availability,Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Indianapolis will face the New Orleans Saints in the NFL football Super Bowl XLIV Sunday. It's widely being rumored that the Colts' quarterback is about to sign the most lucrative contract in the NFL history. Though figures have yet to be confirmed . It is believed that the contract will eclipse that signed by his younger brother Eli, worth at the time $97.5 million over 6 years. photo appears courtesy of Associated Press / Eric Gay ......

If as expected, the player does sign the dotted line on the contract extension then he’ll not only become one of the highest paid players in the NFL . But he’ll also eclipse the contract signed by his younger brother, Eli Manning of the New York Giants. If one remembers that was also an extension that will pay Giants’ quarterback $97.5 million over six years. Netting him an average of $16.25 million per year (of that $97.5 million-$43 million was guaranteed). Now as to whether or not the younger Manning is worth that sort of money , I’ve leave that up you to decide. Granted , he’s led the team to a surprising Superbowl (SBXLII) win over the New England Patriots in 2008. But since that win, the Giants have been something of anathema as a team.

Courtesy of ESPN.com

Irsay plans to break bank for Peyton

By Len Pasquarelli , ESPN.com

MIAMI — Negotiations to extend the contract of Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning will begin in earnest after the season, Colts owner Jim Irsay confirmed on Tuesday, and the new deal is expected to make the Colts’ star the highest-paid player in NFL history and to keep him with the franchise for his entire career.

Manning’s current deal, the final two years of which have been technically voided, will expire after the 2010 season.

“You know it’s going to get done,” Irsay said during media day interviews. “I think it’s clear, and we’ll start on it this summer. That’s been the way we do things [to hammer out an extension when a player is entering the final year of his contract]. And it’ll be the biggest [contract] in history; there’s not much doubt about that.”

Irsay has said in the past that Manning will be “a Colt for life,” and he reiterated that stance on Tuesday morning.

Manning, 33, signed a contract extension for $99.2 million in 2004, and the deal included a record $34.5 million singing bonus, all of it paid up front. The final two seasons of that contract were voided because Manning met predetermined playing-time incentives, making 2010 the final year of the deal.

The Manning contract, Irsay said, “is the easy one to do, because you know it’s going to have to be the highest ever.” The Colts’ owner noted the “harder deals” are the ones involving good, but less important players, and cited former Indianapolis starters like guard Steve McKinney and linebackers Marcus Washington and David Thornton, veterans whom the Colts could not afford to pay because of the franchise’s salary structure, and were forced to sacrifice to free agency.

“It simply comes to one question, and that’s replaceability,” Irsay explained. “Everything is based on the replaceability factor. You make decisions based on who you can afford to target and keep. … Other guys you really want to [re-sign] you might have trouble doing it, because of what it costs you, and how much attention they’re getting [from other teams in free agency]. We don’t have that luxury and we’ve had to work hard.”

Team president Bill Polian said during the season that the club, because it had such high-profile players, often had to determine “how fungible” some players and positions were. But Irsay, who invested about $100 million into the club after his father, Robert Irsay, died in 1997, is prepared to make Manning a very rich man. The younger Irsay, in fact, has dipped into his own wallet in the past to fund the contracts of some key players.

Ironically, the contracts of Manning and New England quarterback Tom Brady are both up after the 2010 campaign. Irsay allowed he will “watch closely” the bargaining on the Brady deal.

“We didn’t have the luxury [of not having a salary cap],” Irsay said. “Without one, not having those [constraints], we would have done an incredible job.”
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In order to read Len Pasquarelli’s article in
its entirety just click unto the link provided .
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NFL  Commissioner ,<strong> Roger Goodell</strong>  inset,  seated   left    is   seen  here   with  his   union  executive   counterpart  NFLPA  Executive  Director ,  DeMaurice  Smith  ,   seen  here   up   on  Capitol   Hill,  DC ,  in  front  of  the  empaneled   Senate  Judiciary  Committee.   photo  appears   courtesy of  Associated Press   /  Charles Dharapak   .......................
NFL Commissioner , Roger Goodell inset, seated left is seen here with his union executive counterpart NFLPA Executive Director , DeMaurice Smith , seen here up on Capitol Hill, DC , in front of the empaneled Senate Judiciary Committee. photo appears courtesy of Associated Press / Charles Dharapak .......................

It is by no means a surprise that the Colts’ organization would want to lock Peyton Manning up to a long term deal. And if as suggested, by the owner ,Jim Irsay , that it is his intention to have the player play his entire career with the team. Then they’re now pretty much sure that this is the way that they want to reward him. Without a doubt, Manning himself, has been one of the best quarterbacks ever to have graced the NFL. But that asides, it leaves somewhat of an unsavory taste in one’s mouth when you consider that he couldn’t have done it without the full complementary of players that he’s been surrounded by. And how are they, then to be rewarded when their contracts are up for renewal or extension ? With this upcoming season (2010-11) very well being an uncapped season if the NFL , the owners and the NFLPA (Players’ Union) are unable to make an assertive effort in reaching common ground, with regard to a renewal of the collective bargaining agreement. Then the whole rationale and inner workings of a great many teams within the league could be turned upside down. As it is, NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith is itching for a fight and looking to derail the somewhat autocratic rule of NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. As contentious as the two sides appear to be with regard to the ongoing negotiations and the very fact that both sides addressed the members of Congress and then met in convened meeting in-front of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Nothing was accomplished , other than the usual amount of posturing and pandering by both sides. Never mind the fact that at times it looked as if the empaneled members seemed to be in awe of the NFL players who addressed them. But should we really expect anything else from these legislators ?

(Left to right) General manager Bill Polian, team owner Jim Irsay and Peyton Manning (#18) of the Indianapolis Colts look on during Super Bowl XLIV Media Day at Sun Life Stadium on February 2, 2010 in Miami Gardens, Florida.  photo  appears  courtesy  of  Getty  Images/  Doug Benc  ..........
(Left to right) General manager Bill Polian, team owner Jim Irsay and Peyton Manning (#18) of the Indianapolis Colts look on during Super Bowl XLIV Media Day at Sun Life Stadium on February 2, 2010 in Miami Gardens, Florida. photo appears courtesy of Getty Images/ Doug Benc ..........

The hard part here is to fully comprehend how both sides were one minute all sync with one another concerning going forward. And the next accusations are being leveled by both sides against each other , as to the greed and disingenuousness shown by both sides. Neither side it appears wants to acquiesce to the others’ wishes , as they feel that it would show a sign of weakness on their part. It may well be that they aren’t overly concerned as to what the fans are indeed thinking about the situation at this juncture. A lockout, reminiscent of the labor dispute that shut down the entire NFL in in 1987 for several weeks and that led to a great deal of discord between the union and the NFL . Something along those lines once again and we’re liable to see the fans quite possibly abandon the game and the NFL altogether. But were the NFL to use replacement players as they did in ’87, and we would be liable to see the tension build up even further between the two parties. There’s nothing like a ‘bunch of greedy owners’ and ‘their self serving counterparts’ ,as in the ‘highly overpaid players’ bickering about how many more millions that they can slice off the piece of an ever diminishing slice of an already big piece of pie. One thing is for sure , neither the players or the fans will take kindly to seeing replacement players taking to the field and then calling it an NFL game. At the same time one doubts that the NFL owners and its hierarchy are stupid enough to do such a thing ?

Courtesy of ESPN.com


Harsh reality: Labor pains ahead

By Tim Graham , ESPN.com

Miami — The NFL will be in full glory this week. A marvelous Super Bowl matchup between the Indianapolis Colts and New Orleans Saints is days away.

Soon after the confetti flitters about Sun Life Stadium and the Lombardi Trophy is hoisted triumphantly, football’s showcase event will give way to uncertainties and insecurities about an imminent labor clash, one that will have significant ramifications on the 2010 season, could lead to a 2011 lockout and might even scuttle an entire season.

You’ve ignored the NFL labor situation, hoping it would fix itself before you invested one minute of your life, one ounce of worry.

“I’ll just watch football,” you thought. “I’ll concentrate on the season, the stars, the X’s and O’s. I’ll carry on as though the NFL is simply in the greatest league in the world, a game, a diversion from real-world issues — not an industry.”

Time to start paying attention to the big business, folks.

Big trouble is near.

Collective bargaining agreements, economics, uncapped seasons and revenue haggling aren’t nearly as entertaining as game highlights and chalk talk.

But if you want to follow along with what could evolve into the most important off-field storyline in recent sports history, you’ll need to learn the issues. (The NFL, league and owners are synonymous. So are the NFL Players Association, the union and the players.)

What’s on the line?
The owners and players have until March 5 to hammer out a new collective bargaining agreement, essentially the off-field rule book for an $8 billion industry. If they do not reach new terms, a host of provisos will be triggered.

Most significantly, the 2010 season will be played without a salary cap or floor, allowing teams to spend as much or as little as they wish. Two weeks ago, New York Giants owner John Mara indicated that an uncapped season appeared unavoidable. If a new CBA isn’t struck by March 2011, a lockout would be highly probable.

How did we get here?
The players got the upper hand on the owners in 2006, the last time they hashed out a CBA. The players were able to renegotiate what revenues were considered a part of the financial pie, from which they would receive about 60 percent.

The salary cap skyrocketed from $80 million per team in 2005 to $102 million the next year. In each subsequent season, the cap climbed to about $109 million, $116 million and $128 million for the 2009 season. The salary floor — the amount of money teams are forced to spend — was $112 million this season, or $32 million more than the highest ceiling under the previous CBA. By doing so, the owners froze the percentage of revenues dedicated to player costs at 57.5 percent.

In 2008, the owners voted unanimously to exercise a clause that allowed either side to opt out of the CBA one or two years early.

What does the league want?
The owners’ objective is to retain more revenues, because they’re assuming virtually all of the risk in this business venture. Their mission statement is that they want to provide long-term stability and growth opportunities, but their margins are thinning because of the U.S. economy. Sponsorship dollars are scarcer. There were 22 blackouts this season, up from nine in 2008. Money has been sunk into stadiums and practice facilities.

At the top of the league’s wish list is an 18 percent rollback in salaries and a rookie salary cap that would redirect money to proven talent rather than players who might not have what it takes. Another way for the owners to grow the revenue pie would be expanding the regular season to 18 games.

What does the NFL Players Association want?
Maintaining the status quo would be just fine with the players.

What would an uncapped year mean in 2010?
It sounds like an uncapped year would favor the players, because it gives the impression that freewheeling owners would start throwing money around in their quest for a Super Bowl title. But the uncapped year is a bit of a misnomer. It’s true there wouldn’t be a salary cap. Deep-pocketed teams such as the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins and New England Patriots could spend as much as they want. But in reality there would be no financial limitations at all. Teams would have no salary floor to maintain, although minimum individual player salaries still would need to be met. The salary floor for 2009 was about $108 million.

How would the uncapped year affect free agency for the upcoming season?
These changes would be unfavorable for the players. The requirement to be eligible for unrestricted free agency would jump from four years to six. Rather than being allowed to hit the open market, 212 players would be restricted free agents instead. Teams have the right of first refusal on restricted free agents and would receive draft compensation if they chose not to match the offer.

Some of the bigger names who would have been unrestricted but would not be in an uncapped year include Denver Broncos receiver Brandon Marshall and outside linebacker Elvis Dumervil, San Diego Chargers receiver Vincent Jackson and linebacker Shawne Merriman, Houston Texans linebacker DeMeco Ryans and Cowboys receiver Miles Austin.

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Click on the above link shown to read Tim Graham’s piece
in its entirety.
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For the Colts as an organization they’ve been somewhat fiscally prudent but at the same time when one sees in large part one player taking up in excess of 1/3 of a team’s salary in order for that player to re-sign and remain with the team. One has to ask the question how much is enough when it comes to the players and their ever burgeoning need to earn even more ? It’s OK in the good times when the money is said to be plentiful a bullish economic times. But when there’s an acute crisis within their midst what would it suggest that the NFL and their teams ought to be doing ? If they can’t seemingly show some constraint and then expect the fans to make the outlay to see their games. Then surely there’s something amiss with the whole business concept and template with which the NFL continues to operates under ?

At age 33 , it could well be that Peyton Manning could play another decade in the NFL. And with the proposed contract that’s being offered that scenario seems to be all but a certainty. As to whether not it’s a 6 year $100 million contract or something akin to 10 years $150 million-$180 million remains to be seen. The one thing you can be sure of , is that the print and tv media will not let this story go. If anything it will become the piece’ de resistance for the likes of ESPN/ABC Sports , Fox Sport, NBC Sports , CBS Sports and the vast coterie of sports’ reporting organizations across the landscape. Money can be the ‘root of all evil’ but it can also come as a blessing in disguise. Somehow , for someone of Peyton Manning’s stature , I’m not so sure that it really matters or not. I get the feeling that if he were asked to simply play a game of ‘tag football’ in a playground , he’d still derive the same amount of pleasure as he does playing in the NFL.

What are your thoughts on the matter ?

The O’Jays perform their international smash hit ‘For The Love of Money’ on the famed r&b show ‘Soul Train’ , hosted by famed presenter, Don Cornelius .

tophatal ……….:)

Voluptuous  model and  aspiring  actress <strong>  Bianca  Holland </strong>.     Less  is more as  they   say  .  And  <strong>the  more  of  Bianca   that  we  see </strong> the  less  concerned  we  are  about  our  other  problems wouldn't  you   say  ?
Voluptuous model and aspiring actress Bianca Holland . Less is more as they say . And the more of Bianca that we see the less concerned we are about our other problems wouldn't you say ?

16 thoughts on “PTI (Pardon The Interruption) But You’re Going To Pay Him What ? How Much ? Get The **ck Out Of Here !

    1. Chris Humpherys

      The figures could get astronomical if things get out of whack if there’s an uncapped season and hopefully no NFL stoppage.

      The likes of the Redskins and Cowboys would start to loot every other teams’ rosters given the chance.

      As for Peyton , I can’t begrudge him getting paid but when is enough going to be enough ?

      Lakshmi

      I’d like to put a world of hurt on Lakshmi Padma. Have you seen her Carl’s Jr ad ?

      Alan Parkins

      Like

    1. Chris Humpherys

      That could all go out the window if Smith and Goodell can’t sort this shit out ! An uncapped season could kill the game as we know it. Especially if there’s a lockout. So becareful what you wish for .

      Alan Parkins

      Like

    2. Chris Humpeherys

      Tickets being bought won’t be enough should there be a labor stoppage. We already know that NFPA Union President Kevin Mawae and Exec Dir DeMaurice Smith have an edict set up with regard to union dues , so that they have a war chest ready should there be a stoppage. This is looking bad allround if they can’t come to some sort of an agreement. One would’ve thought that they and Roger Goodell would be working around the clock to get something done ?

      I’d hate to think what would happen were there to be a prolonged stoppage of more than a month ? I wasn’t here in ’87 but from what I heard the lockout was bad and the NFL used replacement players. And not only that but the games were sub-standard because of the poor play overall.

      Alan Parkins

      Like

    1. al clements

      What does it say when three of the four major sports have a fiscal policy in terms of adopting a salary cap ? But MLB continues to go down the garden path of stupidity and financial irresponsibility ?

      The NBA , NFL and NHL seem to have their houses in order at present. But that being said if there’s a lockout in the offseason of the NFL , or they play this upcoming season as an uncapped one. Then all hell is liable to turn loose.

      With regard to Manning however, I don’t begrudge the fact that the team is prepared to ‘break the bank’ to retain his services. But at the end of the day it will somehow come back to bite them in the ass. It always does , as ‘karma’ is a bitch as they say. You’ll essence be giving one player 1/3 of the team’s salary just to show him how much you care ?

      Well at least it’s not like the bonuses they were throwing around on Wall St that’s so beloved by the ‘right’ for no fuck_g reward ! How is that the assholes such as O’Reilly, Limbaugh, McConnell and Hannity are all so happy to see the big wigs on Wall St have free rein ? But the moment the shit hits the fan they become as quiet as a church mouse ? You tell me al, you seem to be lauding the conservative trait more often than not ? Why is it that those assholes don’t want to see financial oversight within the industry ?

      Alan Parkins

      Like

  1. Well, if there’s anyone deserved of the highest paid player, it’s probably Peyton. I actually met Irsay when he was golfing at Pebble Beach before the Colts played the Niners a few years ago. He’s a really nice guy, so I hope this works out for him.

    Like

    1. chappy 81

      I don’t doubt for one minute that Irsay isn’t a nice guy. But the way I look at it now there are far bigger concerns now facing the NFL. With the prospects of there being an enforced lockout if neither side can reach an agreement by March 5th on a new collective bargaining agreement. Then the whole NFL gets turned upside down, from a situation that it may not be able to completely recover from .

      And that’s with them entering into an uncapped season. From thereon in , all bets are off as far as salaries are concerned . It’ll be the survival of the fittest in terms of the teams and what they can actually afford.

      So don’t think for one minute with Peyton getting paid this is a good thing for the NFL. If anything it could prove to be the exact opposite.

      Both the NFL and NFLPA could be heading for a really nasty showdown with regard to the ‘collective bargaining agreement’ .

      Alan Parkins

      Like

  2. When it comes to some of the ridiculous salaries in sports, I’ve often said thay nobody is worth that kind of money. Peyton Manning might come close, as he is valued so highly by the Colts organzation, the team, and their fans.

    Like

    1. aero

      There are but three people in sports worth that type of money as far as I’m concerned. Two of them play in the NFL and the other is in MLB . The two are Brady and Peyton Manning in the NFL and Albert Pujols in baseball. Other than that there’s no other athlete I believe in teams sports in North America that’s worth that sort of money to begin with !

      Finally, I think that the deal may well set a precedent . But at the same time it’ll be a warning to others because if they , the NFL and NFLPA (Union) go into the offseason without an agreement for the 2011 season. Then all hell will break loose without a salary cap and the possibility of there being a lockout and labor stoppage.

      Alan Parkins

      Like

    1. Chris Humpherys

      When they had the NFL stoppage in ’87 wasn’t it also about money then ? And that didn’t seem to avert what then took place. Albeit that the NFL then used ‘scabs’ in trying to save the season.

      So don’t think that Smith and Union President , Kevin Mawae , won’t call for a walkout. If they’ve already pre-planned for it. Don’t you think that they’ve thought about it ?

      Like I said in an earlier statement they’ve already set aside funds to avert any problems .

      Alan Parkins

      Like

  3. I don’t know if any of these guys deserve the overall bank that they bring in… but since it’s going to be that way anyway, then I have to say that Peyton deserves to be the highest paid in the NFL – he’s just frickin’ unreal and really fun to watch…

    Like

    1. KSP

      Not so long ago I wouldn’t have mind. But with the uncertainly of the situation between the NFL and the NFLPA . I think that this could set a very dangerous precedence. Albeit that Irsay and Polian feel that Manning is long due. But this is the second time they’ve opened up the bank vault to the guy at the expense of others who ended up leaving.

      At the end of the day as they say “…..it is what is”.

      Alan Parkins

      Like

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