The NCAA Is An Archaic System That Has Outlived Its Usefulness

The NCAA Is An Archaic System That Has Outlived Its Usefulness

Once again it appears that another collegiate coach has overstepped his parameters as a coach by flouting the rules of the NCAA by violating a number of ordinances that govern college recruiting and that might also cover academic fraud. Tenneessee Volunteers’ basketball coach Bruce Pearl has admitted lying to members of the NCAA’s Infraction’s Committee after the college’s athletics program is said to have committed several recruitment violations. Pearl is said to have not only obstructed the investigation of the committee but at although the findings there are not yet complete and ready for the public’s notification he firmly believes that he’ll still be able to retain his position as the Volunteers men’s basketball coach.

It has to be said that Tennessee and the faculty there has yet to take any action against the coach even though Pearl admitted that he made a profound error in judgment and awaits clarification as to what action will be taken by the university. My question is that the NCAA seems to be quick to act with impunity when a student athlete violates an NCAA rule that governs collegiate athletics. But yet when a coach is involved in such an act they’ve effectively chosen not to punish the coach. And what action if any one would have thought appropriate wherein the college themselves would take necessary a stance to countermand those transgressions. In the case of former USC Trojans’ basketball coach Tim Floyd who knowingly gave cash to a recruit , O J Mayo and then denied any wrongdoing before leaving the program by choice without any admission of guilt. The school at the time while conducting its own internal investigation and audit clearly overlooked the coach’s actions but would then seek to nullify the charges made by the NCAA when they found that not only were Floyd’s actions clearly a transgression of the NCAA rules but that there was a vast cover-up enacted to hide the actions of both coach and player. But the actions of the athletics’ department just didn’t stop there but it also covered the actions of former football players at the school most notably that the 2005 Heisman Trophy winner Reggie Bush.

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Slide show gallery.

The fallout from what has transpired at USC has led to the school undergoing severe NCAA sanctions of which they won’t be able to make a postseason appearance for two years as well as losing numerous athletics’ scholarships . But what might be even more unbelievable is the mere fact that former Trojans’ football coach Pete Carroll claims that he was completely unaware as to what was going on within the program at the time. Carroll’s departure prior to the sanctions being announced and then the abrupt action by Reggie Bush to return his Heisman Trophy to the Heisman Trophy Committee would suggest that there was a great deal that the public and alumni of the college were never completely made aware of . Once again a coach walks away ‘Scot-Free’ , with some questionable actions on his part and that of a former player who’s said to have profited financially while attending the school and all this happening under the nose of the then AD Mike Garrett who has since re-signed to be replaced by Pat Haden.

Stories such as this have been cropping up with alarming regularity around the world of collegiate athletics and a number of the programs in question are prominent schools that are synonymous with collegiate athletics excellence. Now under the microscope is U-Conn mens’ basketball coach Jim Calhoun and once again his actions that of several compliance officers and coaching staff are being questioned as to what they knew and did concerning the recruitment of a number of players to the school’s basketball program. Calhoun has repeatedly skirted around the issue stating that there’s been no wrongdoing on his part and that he knows of no incidents where he or any of his staff have acted inappropriately. However the NCAA’s findings have suggested that not only may Jim Calhoun known about the violations in question but he may well have played a part in its orchestration. What surprises me in all of this has been the fact that the NCAA chooses to punish only the schools for the actions that are knowingly perpetrated by coaches and staff members and then make it known that the athletes are the ones who are also complicit in this all. I’d like to know why it is that no action can be taken against the coaches themselves ?

OK so the coaches are in the employment of the schools that have hired them but then again their remuneration packages are such, that they’re being paid not only to bring success to the program but also the prerequisite talent to those respective sports. And any action taken wherein a coach is fired without due cause can lead to a wrongful dismissal lawsuit. If those actions by the coaches are egregious and they bring about sanctions even if the main cause has been the undue acts of an athlete then it’s my belief that if the violations have a veracity to them then the coaches should be either fired or suspended. In the real world where an employee has broken a rule or committed a criminal act then the employer is quite within their right to dismiss that employee. Why not in the world of collegiate athletics ?

The NCAA is also is just as much to blame in this all because of their lack of oversight in not doing what I believe would be appropriate and that is to conduct a regular audit of schools on a regular basis. Much like independent audit can be conducted on a public company by the SEC when they feel that there’s been misconduct by its board of directors. But then again we tend to make comparisons of some institutions and that of the Federal government and how they go about dealing with misconduct. As way too often excuses are made by the institutions in question when they’re asked to undertake an investigation. Idiocy abounds when repeatedly we’re told that they have found no wrongdoing when it’s clear that there’s been egregious actions on the part of a company. However with the NCAA, it’s a case where they tend to pick and choose who they are prepared to make an example of . For a body that has to oversee collegiate athletics the bureaucracy within the institution is archaic and cumbersome . It’s also reflected by the complete lack of transparency that’s shown by the NCAA . A multi billion dollar institution that in essence rules over its kingdom like a third world despot leader but who tries to give the impression to the world that there isn’t a problem at all within its domain because they have it all under control.

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Picture galley for your perusal.

What if anything do you feel ought to imposed upon a coach when it’s clear that there has been an egregious NCAA violation where he or she has played a part in that transgression ? Do you feel that the coach ought to be suspended or fired where the act is egregious and he has played a part in the violation ? Also how do you view the NCAA under the new tenure of its President Mark Emmert ? Do you believe that there has been enough transparency by the NCAA since Emmert took over from his predecessor Myles Brand ? Make your thoughts known felt by simply leaving a comment as you’d deem fit and thanks as always for the continued support as it’s great appreciated .

NB: It has since been announced that U Conn imposed sanctions against itself after admitting that they had in fact violated rules concerning contact between recruits and coaches . Also that there’s tenuous actions with regard to academic fraud at the school.

Alan aka tophatal ……………………. 🙂

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